bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
 
bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
 
bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
 
bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
 
bronze Cupid and Dolphin figure
 

17. Bronze Figure of Cupid and Dolphin


'Fantastic Patina'

A fine cast bronze figure of a cupid holding a dolphin on his right shoulder, rich patina. I'm not sure how old it is, but the high quality of this figure is obvious to see. It was brought back from Italy by Mr Fowler in 1951.

In Roman mythology, Cupid was the god of love in all its varieties, the counterpart of the Greek god Eros. According to myth, Cupid was the son of Mercury, the winged messenger of the gods, and Venus, the goddess of love.


Condition: Fine.

Dimensions: Height 11cm.

Provenance: From the private collection of the late A.P. Fowler of Wimbledon, London, UK; thence by descent to his grandson and auctioned in 2020. The collection includes hand-written records showing Mr Fowler was in Italy during the early spring of 1951 and visited sites including Pompeii, Herculaneum and Palermo in Sicily.

£300.00

Cupid

In Roman mythology, Cupid was the god of love in all its varieties, the counterpart of the Greek god Eros. According to myth, Cupid was the son of Mercury, the winged messenger of the gods, and Venus, the goddess of love.

He often appeared as a winged infant carrying a bow and a quiver of arrows whose wounds inspired love or passion in his every victim. He was sometimes portrayed wearing armour like that of Mars, the god of war, perhaps to suggest ironic parallels between warfare and romance or to symbolize the invincibility of love.

Although some literature portrayed Cupid as callous and careless, he was generally viewed as beneficent, on account of the happiness he imparted to couples both mortal and immortal. At the worst he was considered mischievous in his matchmaking, this mischief often directed by his mother, Venus. In one tale, her machinations backfired when she used Cupid in revenge on the mortal Psyche, only to have Cupid fall in love and succeed in making Psyche his immortal wife.

In art, Cupid is often shown riding a dolphin symbolizing his mother's origins in the sea. Dolphins represent affection and were portrayed in antiquity as friendly to humans, hence the association with the god of love.


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